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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases – October 17, 2014

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

Governor Walker has proclaimed October 19 to 25 as “Teen Driver Safety Week” in Wisconsin. David Pabst, director of WisDOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety, says the fact that teen drivers have less experience behind the wheel puts them at greater risk for crashes.

Cut 1: David Pabst, Bureau of Transportation Safety (370 KB/24 seconds)

“They tend to speed and drive aggressively, and often, they don’t take the time to buckle up. Teens are easily distracted by electronic devices or by passengers. We have laws like the Graduated Drivers License law that limit the number of passengers teens can carry. But parents also play a key role by modeling safe driving habits, and by setting clear rules and consequences on their teen drivers.”

Cut 2: David Pabst, Bureau of Transportation Safety (284 KB/18 seconds)

“State law prohibits new drivers from using a cell phone when behind the wheel and texting while driving is illegal for all motorists. The risk for a crash goes up significantly when a teenage driver is carrying teen passengers. So passengers need to do their part by buckling up, and don’t do anything that might distract the driver.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Pabst (995 KB/64 seconds)

Governor Walker has proclaimed October 19 to 25 as “Teen Driver Safety Week” in Wisconsin. 28 teenagers lost their lives on Wisconsin roads last year. David Pabst, Director of the DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety, says teens need to make better decisions behind the wheel.

“They tend to speed and drive aggressively, and often, they don’t take the time to buckle up. Teens are easily distracted by electronic devices or by passengers. We have laws like the Graduated Drivers License law that limit the number of passengers teens can carry. But parents also play a key role by modeling safe driving habits, and by setting clear rules and consequences on their teen drivers.”

State law prohibits new drivers from using a cell phone when behind the wheel and texting while driving is illegal for all motorists. The risk for a crash goes up significantly when a teenage driver has teen passengers. So, passengers need to do their part by buckling up and not doing anything that will distract the driver. This is Brock Bergey reporting.

Wisconsin State Patrol Captain Brian Ausloos talks about “Operation Safe Driver” October 19 to 25 which emphasizes the need for commercial truck operators and all other motorists to share the road and interact safely.

Cut 1: Captain Brian Ausloos, State Patrol (319 KB/20 seconds)

“The goal of Operation Safe Driver is to prevent traffic crashes involving semi-trucks, buses and other commercial motor vehicles. Inspectors will check log-books, brakes and equipment on large trucks — but at the same time, we’ll watch how other motorists interact with large trucks — so officers will be on the look-out for speeders, tailgaters and impaired drivers as well.”

Cut 2: Captain Brian Ausloos, State Patrol (307 KB/20 seconds)

“Whether it’s the driver of a car or a large truck, driver error is the common factor in about 90 percent of fatal crashes between cars and large trucks. That’s why we focus attention not only on truck drivers and their equipment — but we also want to make sure the general motoring public is abiding by traffic laws so everyone can reach their destination safely.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Ausloos (820 KB/52 seconds)

Inspectors with the Wisconsin State Patrol will join their counterparts across North America as part of “Operation Safe Driver” October 19 through the 25. This is State Patrol Captain Brian Ausloos.

“Whether it’s the driver of a car or a large truck, driver error is the common factor in about 90-percent of fatal crashes between cars and large trucks. That’s why we focus attention not only on truck drivers and their equipment — but we also want to make sure the general motoring public is abiding by traffic laws so everyone can reach their destination safely.”

As part of the week-long initiative, State Patrol inspectors will make sure large truck operators are properly licensed and have log books in good order. Other motorists can do their part by staying out of a trucker’s blind spot, and when passing a large truck, be sure to leave enough room before pulling back into your lane. This is Rob Miller reporting.


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Last modified: October 17, 2014

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