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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases - July 18, 2014

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

You’re travelling along the highway when you see a large maintenance vehicle on a bridge with a long hydraulic arm and bucket. Chances are you’re seeing engineers conducting a routine bridge inspection. Scot Becker, director of WisDOT’s Bureau of Structures, explains the bridge inspection process.

Cut 1: Scot Becker, Bureau of Structures (382 KB/24 seconds)

“This time of year, it’s not uncommon to see inspectors out on bridges. All bridges are required to be routinely inspected at least once every two years. Sometimes a bridge is inspected more frequently due to its age, type, condition or traffic load. The Department of Transportation inspects bridges on Interstate and state highways, while local units of government handle all other bridge inspections by usually hiring consultants.”

Cut 2: Scot Becker, Bureau of Structures (253 KB/16 seconds)

“A routine inspection involves visually examining the structural components of the bridge, and identifying an overall rating factor for the bridge supports, girders and deck — which is the driving surface. WisDOT uses these ratings to help prioritize bridge improvement projects.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Becker (925 KB/59 seconds)

It’s that time of year when inspectors are taking a routine look at bridges along Wisconsin roadways. This is Scot Becker, head of the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Structures.

“All bridges are required to be routinely inspected at least once every two years. Sometimes a bridge is inspected more frequently due to its age, type, condition or traffic load. The Department of Transportation inspects bridges on Interstate and state highways, while local units of government handle all other bridge inspections by usually hiring consultants.”

Inspecting larger bridges often requires use of a “reach all” vehicle where inspectors ride in a bucket at the end of a long, hydraulic arm. During a routine inspection, engineers look at structural components such as bridge supports, girders and the deck or driving surface. There are about 13,700 bridges in Wisconsin including about 5,000 along the State Highway System. This is Rob Miller reporting.

Some Wisconsin roads are getting a fresh coat of paint this summer. Debby Kozol (kohzl), with WisDOT’s Bureau of Traffic Operations, reminds you to watch out for paint crews restriping lane markings.

Cut 1: Debby Kozol, Bureau of Traffic Operations (339 KB/22 seconds)

“A typical paint crew works in a three vehicle convoy, with the paint truck leading the way. When you come across one of these convoys — slow down and stay behind the last vehicle. Resist the temptation of driving in between the convoy. For these workers, the highway is their office. Entering the convoy risks your life and that of the workers.”

Cut 2: Debby Kozol, Bureau of Traffic Operations (313 KB/20 seconds)

“Paint trucks have directional wet paint signs on their vehicles and the crew will place paint convoy or road work ahead signs in advance of where they are working. The convoy will pull over whenever possible to allow traffic to pass. You’re going to have to slow down for a few minutes, but we want everyone to reach their destination safely."

Cut 3: Wrap with Kozol (905 KB/58 seconds)

It’s time to talk about a fresh coat of paint. Not on your house, but on several roads around the state. Debby Kozol, with WisDOT’s Bureau of Traffic Operations, reminds you to watch out for paint crews restriping lane markings.

“A typical crew works in a three vehicle convoy, with the paint truck leading the way. When you come across one of these convoys — slow down and stay behind the last vehicle. Resist the temptation of driving in between the convoy. For these workers, the highway is their office. Entering the convoy risks your life and that of the workers.”

Paint crews have wet paint signs on their vehicles and place paint convoy or road work ahead signs along the route they are working on. Pay attention to those wet paint signs and don’t cross over freshly applied paint. It can splatter on to your tires and vehicle; getting it off is not an easy task. This is Brock Bergey reporting.


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LLast modified: July 17, 2014

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